R

52vis Week 2 Challenge — Australian Version

I mapped out the USA homelessness rate in my last post as a challenge and noted at the end that it would be interesting to do the same for Australia. That was the first comment I received in person, too….Continue Reading →

52vis Week 2 Challenge

From Bob Rudis’ blog comes a weekly data/coding challenge. I didn’t quite get the time to tackle last week’s but I thought this one offered up a pretty good opportunity.

Bring on the ROpenSci #auunconf 2016!

I’ll be heading to the 2016 ROpenSci un-conference (hackathon) in Brisbane later this month to smash out a heap of open-science R code. Ideas are already flowing quite nicely, and I’m confident that any ideas we don’t end up officially…Continue Reading →

Is it crowded in here?

This was a neat graphic that someone made. It shows the population at a given latitude or longitude as a bar chart, overlayed on a map of the world itself. It shows where people live; the bigger the bar, the…Continue Reading →

Adelaide Traffic – Part I

Have you seen the little shark-fins on top of some traffic light control boxes? Have you seen the new ‘x minutes to y road‘ signs? Did you know they’re connected?

SimplyStats Thanksgiving Puzzle

I owe a lot to Jeff Leek and Roger Peng for their great Coursera courses, in which I learned to program in R. They (along with Rafa Irizarry) run the Simply Statistics blog, which I highly reccomend. They posted a…Continue Reading →

Project Euler Q5 :: Smallest multiple

Explanation. Standard caveat: don’t look here if you are trying to do these yourself. 2520 is the smallest number that can be divided by each of the numbers from 1 to 10 without any remainder. What is the smallest positive number…Continue Reading →

Project Euler Q4 :: Largest palindrome product

Explanation. Standard caveat: don’t look here if you are trying to do these yourself. A palindromic number reads the same both ways. The largest palindrome made from the product of two 2-digit numbers is 9009 = 91 √ó 99. Find the…Continue Reading →

Project Euler Q3 :: Largest prime factor

Explanation.¬†Standard caveat: don’t look here if you are trying to do these yourself. The prime factors of 13195 are 5, 7, 13 and 29. What is the largest prime factor of the number 600851475143 ? It seems so simple at…Continue Reading →